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“Red flags” are signs or symptoms that something medically ominous may be going on. Red flags are not reliable, and their presence is not a diagnosis. When you have some red flags, it only indicates a need to look more closely. Sometimes red flags are missing there really is something serious going on… and sometimes they are a false alarm.18 Check off all that apply … hopefully none or few or only the least alarming of them!
Wow this is going to help me a ton! I was just thinking about how I wanted to work on my hips when I was on a 9 mile heavy pack hike yesterday. Even more so when I was done and one of my hips was/is pretty sore. Hips keep us together! Like for real they connect out lower and upper body lol. Need to make sure they are strong, mobile, and flexible which is all something I never really put any effort into improving. I figured my activities like Mountain Biking, Hiking, Climbing, Skiing, and doing squats/lunges along with other exercises would keep them strong. Then I come to find out I only was able to get through 2 rounds… This will now be apart of my training program 🙂 Thanks for the great video! Yes simple but yet it can kick your butt if you are doing proper form ad John Wolf stresses.
After we saw how helpful our first blog post on this topic was, we decided to create another blog with nine more yoga moves to ease hip and low back aches and enhance total body mobility. Both of these blogs are for anyone who has ever felt a twinge of back pain, grimaced from tight hips, or simply needed to hit their body’s refresh button after a long day.

While sciatica is healing, try to remain active. Motion can actually help reduce inflammation and pain. A physical therapist can show you how to gently stretch the hamstring and lower back. Practicing tai chi or yoga can help stabilize the affected area and strengthen your core. Depending on your medical condition, certain exercises may not be recommended. Your doctor may also recommend taking short walks.
MRI and x-ray for low back pain are surprisingly unreliable,1 because things like bulging discs usually aren’t a deal,2 most back pain goes away on its own,3 and trigger points (“muscle knots”) are common and can be alarmingly intense but aren’t dangerous.4 Most patients are much better off when they feel confident about these things. The power of justified, rational confidence is a huge factor in back pain.5 Sadly, many healthcare professionals continue to perpetuate the idea of fragile backs,6 which undermines that valuable confidence.
So, who cares right? Wrong. Everyone has seen that little old man walking with a cane, hunched over almost to the point of staring at the ground. Do you think he always walked like that? I'd bet you he didn't. Maybe he had an injury that never healed properly, or maybe after spending years and years in a similar position, his body became tighter and tighter until eventually he ended up bent over.
Often people go to the doctor seeking help for hip pain. Sometimes, people try to treat it themselves. They are convinced there is something wrong with their hip and the treatments begin. However, one thing is for sure, hip pain is not always as it appears. Hip pain can be a result of a problem in the hip joint itself. However, it can also be a result of a back problem or a soft tissue problem around the hip region.
Below, you’ll find six hip exercises to help strengthen your hips so they can better support your body and running goals. All you need to do them is a mini looped resistance band, so you can easily fit them in at home or wherever your workouts take you. Try out the moves below in sets of 10 to 15 reps and add some (or even all!) of them to your cross-training workouts.
The sacroiliac joint typically has little motion. Small movements at the joint help with shock absorption and forward/backward bending. The joint is reinforced by strong ligaments surrounding it, some of which extend across the joint in the back of the pelvis. This network of soft tissues provides support, limits movement at the joint, and assists with absorbing pressure.
Symptoms may worsen with sitting, standing, sleeping, walking or climbing stairs. Often the SI joint is painful sitting or sleeping on the affected side. Some people have difficulty riding in a car or standing, sitting or walking too long. Pain can be worse with transitional movements (going from sit to stand), standing on one leg or climbing stairs.
With lumbar stenosis nerves in the spinal cord and lower back become compressed. This type of injury can cause many of the symptoms of sciatica—including numbness and tingling in the legs and pain in the buttocks. Possible treatments include a sciatic nerve block, steroid injections, opioid pain medications, physical therapy, and rest. However, the use of epidural steroid injections is not supported by limited amount of available evidence.
Back pain can suck the joy out of your days for week, months, even years. It can definitely be “serious” even when it’s not dangerous. I have worked with many truly miserable chronic low back pain patients, and of course the huge economic costs of back pain are cited practically anywhere the subject comes up. But your typical case of chronic low back pain, as nasty as it can be, has never killed anyone.

A sedentary lifestyle can lead to having weak and tight hip flexors as they are always in the shortened position. Tight hip flexors can lead to a limited range of motion, poor posture, lower back and hip pain, and even injuries. These muscles need to get a workout when you are standing and doing movements such as raising your leg to climb stairs, run, or ride a bicycle.​
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