Your hips are just one of the areas of your body that are prone to tightness and injury if you are a runner. Every stride that you make requires your hip joint to pull forward, and every time that you plant your foot on the pavement, your hips feel the impact. Performing hip stretches before and after a run can help you avoid injury and keep your hips loose and limber. Ease into your hip stretches and do not bounce. Try to hold each one for 30 to 40 seconds and stop if you feel any discomfort.
Below, you’ll find six hip exercises to help strengthen your hips so they can better support your body and running goals. All you need to do them is a mini looped resistance band, so you can easily fit them in at home or wherever your workouts take you. Try out the moves below in sets of 10 to 15 reps and add some (or even all!) of them to your cross-training workouts.
The hip flexors are the group of muscles that allow you to lift your knees toward your chest and bend forward from the hips.  What is collectively referred to as the hip flexors is actually a group of muscles that includes the iliopsoas, the thigh muscles (rectus femoris, Sartorius and tensor fasciae latae), and the inner thigh muscles (adductor longus and brevis, pectineus and gracilis).
It’s well established that about eight in 10 people in the U.S. will experience back pain at some point in their lives. And while the causes of such pain often vary, say physical therapists and other medical professionals say that increasingly, in a world that accommodates a more sedentary lifestyle, the blame for low-back pain can often be traced to an area a little lower in the kinetic chain: the hips.
You're more likely to get a hip flexor injury if you've had one in the past, you don't warm up properly before engaging in athletic activity, your muscles are already tight or stiff, or your muscles are weak from being overused. If, while exercising, you try to do too much at once in too short an amount of time, you can also put yourself at risk for a hip flexor injury.
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